Clark Rejects Governor’s Cuts to New York’s CUNY and SUNY Systems

Barbara M. Clark opposes tuition hikes and supports the Assembly’s budget plan to restore and invest $320 million to local colleges and universities
March 16, 2006
Assemblywoman Barbara M. Clark (D-Cambria Heights) announced that the Assembly’s new budget plan makes significant investments in New York’s higher education system while rejecting the most harmful parts of the governor’s budget.

“The governor should not be allowed to undermine higher education. Universities and colleges are vital to creating a well-trained workforce, new jobs, bringing in federal research dollars, and most importantly, keeping our young people here in New York,” Assemblywoman Clark said. “The failure to properly fund higher education in our state could have disastrous effects on its future.”

The Assembly’s plan restores almost $320 million in state support to local colleges and universities. The plan includes:
  • $131 million to offset tuition hikes for State University of New York and City University of New York students;

  • $119 million in Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) funding;

  • Expanding TAP for part-time students;

  • Increasing overall SUNY/CUNY operating aid-allowing SUNY to add 541 more faculty and CUNY to add 400; and

  • Increasing support for vital opportunity programs by 10 percent.


More than $34 million in aid is provided to local community colleges over two years in the Assembly’s proposal. undertaken the Assembly plan would allow the State of New York to meet its obligation under state law to provide local colleges with 33 percent in support.

“Other than the addition of Part-Time TAP, the Assembly’s budget proposal ensures that more students have access to an affordable college education,” stated Assemblywoman Clark. “The Assembly will fight for a final state budget that strengthens New York’s higher education system.”

During his tenure, the governor has increased tuition by 65 percent, allowed state support for community college funding to drop to the lowest it has been in 30 years, and attempted to cut TAP nine times.

There is no trouble finding world-class learning institutions in New York, but as any student would agree, the most difficult part of pursuing a higher education is finding the money to pay for it. The governor is trying to make it harder for New Yorkers to afford a college education. The U.S. House of Representatives recently voted to slash federal funding for education loans and the governor proposed cutting TAP for some of New York’s most vulnerable students.

“We don’t need to create more obstacles and expenses for students looking to get a college degree,” Assemblywoman Clark said. “In the coming weeks, the Assembly will work in a bipartisan fashion to negotiate a fair, on-time budget that provides our students with the educational opportunities they need to succeed.”