Assemblyman    
DOV   
HIKIND   
Summer 2006       

NEW RENT EXEMPTION

The Disability Rent Increase Exemption (DRIE) is a new program that offers exemption from future rent increases to tenants with disabilities who live in rent controlled or rent stabilized apartments.

To be eligible for DRIE, applicants must be receiving either Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), Veterans Disability pension or compensation, or disability-related Medicaid. The household income limit is $17,580 for individuals and $25,212 for couples. In addition, more than one-third of the income should be going toward the rent.

The program is administered by the New York City Department of Finance. Approved applications will take effect on the first day of the month immediately following the approval. Applications can be obtained by calling 311 or contacting Assemblyman Hikindís office.


The Gift Of Life

We live in a community where charity and acts of kindness are the norm. Organizations abound that raise money to benefit the needy. Ordinary individuals routinely donate their time and efforts to help others, offering volunteer ambulance service, food package delivery, transportation to hospitals and doctors, and even emergency roadside assistance.

In this environment of selfless generosity, Chaya Lipschutz has managed to stand out by literally giving of herself. Three years ago, she decided to respond to an ad in a local paper and donate a kidney to help save the life of a total stranger. She underwent extensive testing, both physical and psychological, and was disappointed when she was turned down by the hospital. Chaya was determined, however, and answered several more newspaper ads, submitting to repeated testing, until she found a patient for whom she was a good match. The surgery was successful, and both donor and recipient are doing well.

photo

Chaya did not stop there. Asking herself, "What more can I do?" she embarked on a campaign to recruit others to donate a kidney, thus saving more lives. She hit upon the idea of using the Jewish Marketplace Expo, which was scheduled last December at the Javits Center, to get her message out and educate people about kidney donation. With the blessing of her rabbi and the encouragement of Assemblyman Hikind, who arranged for a local printer to print 3,500 fliers free of charge, she succeeded within days in setting up a booth and talking to thousands of people. She hopes that the seeds she planted will help lives be saved.

Assemblyman Hikind and kidney donor Chaya Lipschutz - who donated the organ to save the life of a total stranger.



SCAM ALERT!

NEVER GIVE OUT PERSONAL INFORMATION OVER THE TELEPHONE!

There is a new jury duty scam that is being perpetrated in several states. The victim receives a phone call from someone claiming to work for the local court system. He informs the victim that he has failed to report for jury duty and that a warrant has been issued for his arrest. The victim will rightly claim that he never received a jury duty notification. The caller will concede that perhaps a mistake has been made and will then ask for confidential information for "verification" purposes, specifically Social Security number, date of birth, and possibly other private information - exactly what he needs to commit identity theft.

This scam works because the victim is caught off guard and upset at the prospect of an arrest warrant being issued in his name. In reality, "no-show" summonses are almost always delivered by mail. In the rare cases where court officials do call, they never ask for personal information. If you do receive a phone call about jury duty, report it to the state attorney general’s office.

Protect yourself: Never give out your social security number, credit card numbers or other personal information when you receive a phone call.




AN EXCEPTIONAL SCHOOL


photo At a visit to Yeshiva Ohel Sarah of Flatbush, Assemblyman Hikind met with teachers and students of a unique educational institution where, in addition to an excellent scholastic curriculum, emphasis is placed on developing positive character traits and superior moral standards. "I was impressed by the warmth and concern for each child, which is evident from the administration on down and permeates the entire school," the Assemblyman stated.

(L-R) Mr. Moshe Rubashkin of the Crown Heights Jewish Community Council; Assemblyman Hikind; Rabbi Schneer Mendelsohn, administrator; Sarah Mendelsohn, founder and director.




NEW RENT EXEMPTION

The Disability Rent Increase Exemption (DRIE) is a new program that offers exemption from future rent increases to tenants with disabilities who live in rent controlled or rent stabilized apartments.

To be eligible for DRIE, applicants must be receiving either Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), Veterans Disability pension or compensation, or disability-related Medicaid. The household income limit is $17,580 for individuals and $25,212 for couples. In addition, more than one-third of the income should be going toward the rent.

The program is administered by the New York City Department of Finance. Approved applications will take effect on the first day of the month immediately following the approval. Applications can be obtained by calling 311 or contacting Assemblyman Hikind’s office.




FREE EYE CARE FOR SENIORS
eye The EyeCare America Seniors EyeCare Program provides eligible seniors with a complete medical eye exam and care for any eye condition diagnosed for up to one year at no out-of-pocket expense. Volunteer ophthalmologists agree to bill Medicare and any supplemental insurance and accept that as payment in full.
To be eligible, applicants must:
  • be a U.S. citizen or legal resident
  • be age 65 or older
  • not have seen an ophthalmologist in three or more years
  • not belong to an HMO or the VA.
For information or to apply, call
1-800-222-EYES (3937)



CHILD TAX CREDIT
photo At a rally at the State Capitol, Assemblyman Hikind addressed the crowd of thousands of students, parents and school administrators who came to voice their support for education tax credits. The proposed bill would have offered a tax credit to parents of private and parochial school students. "This is a battle that I undertook over 20 years ago, during my first term in office," the Assemblyman remarked. "Low income parents desperately need a break."

The compromise measure that was ultimately signed into law, the Empire State Child Tax Credit, is not limited to educational expenses and provides a maximum benefit of $330 for each child between the ages of 4 and 17. It will allow families to apply their tax savings to any costs that come with raising children, including food, clothing and child care.



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