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A06851 Summary:

BILL NO    A06851 

SAME AS    
SAME AS S01731

SPONSOR    Crespo

COSPNSR    

MLTSPNSR   



Establishes a pilot program related to making the gluten content of food
available at certain state owned, operated, or leased cafeterias.
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A06851 Memo:

NEW YORK STATE ASSEMBLY
MEMORANDUM IN SUPPORT OF LEGISLATION
submitted in accordance with Assembly Rule III, Sec 1(f)
 
BILL NUMBER: A6851
 
SPONSOR: Crespo
  TITLE OF BILL: An act to establish a pilot program related to making the gluten content of food available at certain state owned, operated, or leased cafeterias; and providing for the repeal of such provisions upon expiration thereof   PURPOSE: Establishes a pilot program related to making the gluten content of food available at certain state owned, operated, or leased cafeterias   SUMMARY OF SPECIFIC PROVISIONS: Section 1. Notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, the commissioner of the Office of General Services shall identify four state owned buildings, facilities, or complexes where food and beverages are offered for sale to the gener- al public or government employees in a cafeteria setting which are oper- ated or leased by the state, for inclusion in a gluten content pilot program. One state owned building, facility, or complex for such pilot program shall be located in each of the following cities: Albany, Buffalo, Syracuse, and New York City. The commissioner shall ensure that such the cafeterias contained within the identified buildings, facili- ties, or complexes have an employee available during the hours of opera- tion that can accurately identify upon request whether a food or bever- age item offered is gluten-free. For the purposes of this section, the term "gluten-free" shall include food or beverage that is consistent with the Food and Drug Adminis- tration's final rule to define the term "gluten-free" for voluntary use in the labeling of food. Section 2. This act shall take effect on the 180th day after it shall have become a law.   JUSTIFICATION: This bill will give notice of gluten content in selected cafeterias owned, leased or operated by the state via the establishment of a pilot program by the commissioner of the Office of General Services. The reason to establish this pilot program is to help consumers who are gluten intolerant identify foods that can make them sick. Gluten It's a protein that can cause problems. Gluten is the major protein found in some grains. It is present in all forms of wheat (bulgur, durum, semolina, spelt, farro and more) as well as in barley, rye and triticale (a wheat-rye cross). But gluten can also turn up in unexpected places, like certain brands of chocolate, imitation crab (suriml), deli meats, soy sauce, vitamins and even some kinds of tooth- paste. Gluten is different from protein in other grains (such as rice) and in meat (such as steak) in that it is difficult for humans to digest completely. It can make some people very sick. As a society, we are in a state of "gluten overload," and millions of people of all ages and all walks of life are suffering as a result of a condition that was recognized only a few years ago, called gluten sensi- tivity. When people with gluten sensitivity eat foods containing gluten, it triggers unpleasant symptoms: stomach pains, bloat, heartburn, joint pains, headache, skin rashes, fatigue, insomnia, and brain fog to name some of the most common. The following symptoms are best viewed as one big picture; alone, they may not be strong indicators of a gluten problem but in combination may be a sign that gluten is causing the body to attack itself: 1. Gastrointestinal problems 2. Malabsorption of vitamins 3. Skin rash 4. Migraines 5. Joint pain 6. Lactose intolerance 7. Chronic fatigue 8. Fibromyalgia   LEGISLATIVE HISTORY: 2011-12: S.1124 - Referred to Health, 2010: S.7460 Referred to Health A7627A of 2013 died in Assembly Ways and Means, died in Senate Finance   FISCAL IMPLICATIONS: Minimal.   EFFECTIVE DATE: This act shall take effect on the 180th day after it shall have become a law, and shall be deemed to expire and be repealed three years after it shall have become law.
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