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Assemblyman
Herman D. Farrell, Jr.
Assembly District 71
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Chair, Ways and Means Committee
…and this month in Albany
February 16, 2017

Assemblyman Farrell Reports to Community Board 9

Joint Legislative Budget Hearing on Education Held in Albany

On Tuesday, February 14 members of the Assembly and Senate held a Joint Legislative Budget Hearing on Elementary and Secondary Education components of Governor Cuomo's Executive Budget proposal for State Fiscal Year 2017-2018, the tenth in a series of thirteen Constitutionally-required hearings on the Budget, which we must pass by April 1. State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia and City Department of Education Chancellor Carmen Farina were first to testify, followed by representatives of teachers, students and other groups.

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Assemblyman Farrell greets State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia.

Commissioner Elia's testimony included an overview of the Board of Regents' funding request for an increase of $2.1 billion, exceeding the Governor's plan to increase school aid by $961 million. The Regents' request includes a $1.8 billion foundation aid increase, $100 million to expand and consolidate pre-Kindergarten programs, $100 million in support for students who are English-language learners and $60 million to increase support for college and career pathways.

City Schools Chancellor Details Record Graduation Rates

Chancellor Farina testified that she will not be satisfied "until every single public school student in New York City is getting a high-quality education." She went on to explain that last year's graduation is a record 72.6 percent, as is the postsecondary education rate of 55 percent of the Class of 2015, with 77 percent of those students enrolling in college. More students are also taking and passing Advanced Placement exams and more are prepared for college work, she said.

New Programs in Place to Boost Student Achievement, Chancellor Says

Chancellor Farina testified that this year marks the first full year of implementation for a new college readiness program called Equity and Excellence for All. Also new is a universal literacy program binging over 100 reading coaches into elementary schools, improved math instruction in over 200 schools, and counseling programs in certain high-needs schools, Farina testified.

A Tuesday, January 24 hearing was held on State higher education programs and funding. You may recall from my last report to you that Governor Cuomo earlier announced his budget includes a $163 million plan that would allow students whose household income is less than $125,000 per year to attend SUNY or CUNY without having to pay tuition. Legislative leaders have been discussing this plan with advocates, some of whom have told us that it may be better to help students manage the costs of textbooks, student housing and other costs rather than offer free tuition which may good for the middle class but may not be very helpful to the poor.

This issue was discussed at our hearing on Higher Education components of the budget. Invited speakers included representatives of SUNY and CUNY, student government and administrators. Legislators will use their testimony in our deliberations on the Governor's budget plans as we move toward crafting a finalized budget for State Fiscal Year 2017-2018, which begins April 1.

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Assemblyman Farrell welcomes SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher and SUNY Chairman H. Carl McCall prior to a January 24 Joint Legislative Budget Hearing on Higher Education issues.

Mayor de Blasio and Staff Testify at Legislative Budget Hearing

Mayor Bill de Blasio testified for three hours January 30 on Local Government components of Governor Cuomo's proposed Executive Budget for State Fiscal Year 2017-2018. Also testifying that day were Comptroller Scott Stringer, numerous mayors and local government officials.

Mayor: Fates of City and State are Linked

With Office of Management and Budget's Dean Fuleihan and Director of State Legislative Affairs by his side and occasionally answering questions, the Mayor testified that the State and City are linked and when one prospers, so does the other, pointing to strong recent job growth. According to the Mayor's testimony, though the City accounts for 43 percent of the City's population, 46 percent of jobs and 60 percent of revenue is generated within the City.

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Though the City is economically strong, many need help, the Mayor said, explaining that 58 percent of New Yorkers who receive Medicaid live in the City, as do 53 percent of students who qualify for free or reduced lunch. City officials are tackling those challenges head on, he said.

Pre-Kindergarten Enrollment Exceeds 70,000

Mayor de Blasio testified that 70,000 four-year-olds are enrolled in full-day pre-Kindergarten thanks to the Legislature's decision to invest in this program, and the City is ahead of schedule preparing to meet its' goal of building or preserving 200,000 affordable apartments, having finished over 62,000 so far, he said.

The Mayor said that in his budget for the coming year, which was released the previous week, he called for a $10.4 million investment to pay for bullet-resistant windows in police vehicles, $1 billion over a decade to repair roofs at 729 New York City Housing Authority buildings, $496 million toward the $4.6 billion it will cost to build 38,000 new school seats and other plans.

De Blasio: State Must Take Steps to Shield City from Washington

The Mayor also touched upon news from Washington including changes to immigration rules, plans to revoke the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), how that could affect health care in the City, and other potential disruptions. He asked that State officials craft the budget in a way that will shield local governments and the people they serve from harmful Federal actions.

Turning to the Executive Budget, Mayor de Blasio said he was glad to see support for the DREAM Act and efforts to control Medicaid costs which may save the City $130 million.

He also praised a proposed three-year extension of mayoral control of City schools, efforts to reform elections, Raise the Age, trial reform and criminal justice reform in the Executive Budget plan. Mayor de Blasio joined the Assembly Majority's push to extend and deepen the "millionaires' tax," which he called "critical to all we are trying to do and in line with our values," and also proposed a new tax in the City on homes that sell for $2 million or more.

Comptroller Stringer Supports Assembly Plan to Tax Multi-Millionaires

Comptroller Stringer also offered support to the Assembly's plan to create a new tax surcharge on the highest-earning New Yorkers, which calls for people who earn $100 million or more per year to pay about 10 percent of their income to the State. The Comptroller looked back at recent legislative actions including the $15 minimum wage, growing the number of procurement contracts with businesses owned by women and members of ethnic minorities and Assembly legislation safeguarding access to contraception, which he called efforts to foster an economy in which every New Yorker has a fair chance to get ahead.

Stringer: Washington Threatening Vital City Programs

Comptroller Stringer testified that if the Federal government follows through on recent threats made by the White House, the City could lose 60 percent of funding for anti-terrorism efforts, half the budget for childrens' services and Section 8 vouchers which support 124,000 New York families. NYCHA, which provides housing for 400,000 New Yorkers, depends on the Federal government for 60 percent of its' revenue, the Comptroller said, and the City's public hospital relies on millions of dollars from Washington to remain open to serve the public.

The Comptroller urged Albany to pass the DREAM Act, enact the Excelsior Scholarship program which would award free SUNY or CUNY tuition to students whose household income is under $125,000, fully fund CUNY, expand the child tax credit, and continue investing in education from Pre-K onwards.

Effect of Possible Obamacare Repeal on State Budget Questioned

I recently held a series of Town Hall meetings throughout the District to discuss the question of what will happen if the new leadership in Washington carries through on their plans to get rid of the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), which provides health care coverage to millions of New Yorkers who otherwise do not have access to care. The big answer is that no one knows what they are going to do or how it will affect the country, health care providers or anything else. Governor Cuomo's economists have forecast that if Obamacare goes away entirely, the Federal government will give the State $3.7 billion less in health care funding each year.

If that should happen, it may be the case that the State itself will pick up this cost. Like others in the Legislature I was happy to hear the Governor call for an extension of the "millionaires' tax" a 2 percent surcharge paid by individuals who make more than $1 million and households who earn $2 million per year, using this extra revenue to make up for an expected loss of revenue. However, some in the Assembly believe this will not be nearly enough to cover the cost of continuing Obamacare services if the Federal government refuses to do so. That is why you will hear some members of the Assembly call for a new assessment on the very wealthiest New Yorkers, so that vulnerable New Yorkers may have continued access to quality care.

Yours truly,
Herman "Denny" Farrell, Jr.




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February 15, 2017
Farrell Secures Agreement from MTA for Community Meeting to Address 168th Street IRT Problems

Albany - Assemblyman Herman D. Farrell, Jr. today secured an agreement from the Acting Director of the Metropolitan Transportation Agency to meet with the community to discuss Manhattan's 168th Street IRT station, where riders have been plagued by broken elevators and other problems that have at times taken the station out of service.

Raising the issue during a budget hearing today, Assemblyman Farrell began by praising MTA's recent work on the new Mother Clara Hale Bus Depot before challenging Acting Executive Director Veronique Hakim to explain the problems at the 168th Street station and to detail how the MTA will fix them.

Farrell said that in the past the elevators at this station were rarely out of order, and he "never saw all four out" as has happened at least twice in the last three weeks. In one instance, riders were not allowed off at this stop in the interest of rider safety.

Hakim acknowledged that the elevators must be replaced, and MTA is working to replace them as quickly as possible, including by seeking the "best possible contractors" to do the job quickly.

Further, MTA is "putting a SWAT team" of elevator mechanics at this location in order to quickly respond to elevator breakdowns, Hakim said, calling the problem an "untenable situation for our customers."

Hakim later said she would "absolutely" commit to meeting with the community to discuss problems at the 168th Street IRT station and how MTA will solve them.

Please refer to Assemblyman Farrell's Web page at nyassembly.gov for updates on this important issue.


January 25, 2017
Civil Service Commissioner Testifies on State Workforce Issues
Describes plans to transform state government as "ongoing"

Lola Brabham, Acting Commissioner of the State's Department of Civil Service, testified January 25 before members of the Assembly and Senate budget committees that substantial progress has been made toward a goal of transforming the State's 1.2 million member workforce but work is ongoing.

Acting Commissioner Brabham was the first to speak during a hearing on workforce elements of Governor Cuomo's Executive Budget proposal for State Fiscal Year 2016-2017. The hearing was the second in a series of thirteen, which are required by the State Constitution.

In June 2016, the Civil Service Department undertook a major job classification restructuring, consolidating titles to better reflect the duties of these jobs, she said. The coming months will see continuation of these efforts to hundreds of other State job titles, she said.

Efforts are underway to deliver civil service exams more quickly and efficiently, which will allow high-priority jobs to be filled more quickly, Acting Commissioner Brabham testified, and officials are at work on an Advisory Council which will help diversify the workforce.


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January 24, 2017
Legislative Budget Hearing Held on Higher Education Issues
Hours of questions aired on free SUNY and CUNY tuition plan

Members of the Assembly and Senate budget and education committees attended a hearing January 24 on higher education components of Governor Cuomo's $152.3 billion Executive Budget that lasted nearly eight hours and included testimony from representatives of the State University of New York, City University of New York, education administrators and students.

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Assemblyman Farrell greets SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher and SUNY Chairman H. Carl McCall prior to a hearing on higher education components of the 2017-2018 Executive Budget Proposal.

Lawmakers Seek Details of Proposed Scholarship Program

SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher, who was the first to speak, testified for several hours on the Governor's budget plans including a new program that would offer free SUNY and CUNY tuition to students whose household income is less than $125,000 per year. Lawmakers held forth with pointed questions about details of the newly unveiled $163 million Excelsior Scholarship Program, answers to which were not always forthcoming during the hearing.

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SUNY Chancellor Zimpher fields lawmakers' questions about the proposed Excelsior Scholarship Program.

In terms of overall budget plans, Chancellor Zimpher testified that she was "thrilled" to see that public higher education was at the forefront of the Governor's budget proposal because "a high school degree isn't enough to succeed in today's workforce - we've moved the finish line." Though less than half of all adult New Yorkers hold a degree, 70 percent of jobs require one, the Chancellor said.

SUNY Chancellor: Most Jobs Require Advanced Degree

Overall, the State's public higher education system is the largest in the country and includes 30 community colleges, 29 State-operated colleges, five statutory campuses, three teaching hospitals and a number of programs and activities attended by a student body of 600,000, she said.

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Members of the Assembly Ways and Means and Education Committees listen to testimony on the Executive Budget proposal.

The Executive Budget includes a tuition plan intended to raise $550 million over five years to meet SUNY's capital needs including a major renovation or new project at each campus, Chancellor Zimpher said. The budget also continues SUNY's $18 million Performance Investment Fund which is geared to encourage students to complete their degree in a timely fashion to open SUNY resources to more students and minimize student loan debt, she said.

Support for SUNY Community Colleges

SUNY's budget request includes a new $30 million plan to help community colleges as well as a plan to make up for losses incurred by treating uninsured and underinsured patients at SUNY teaching hospitals, Chancellor Zimpher said.

Responding to a question from Assemblyman Farrell about a proposed $5 million cut to the Educational Opportunity Program inquiring how that cut could harm the program and low-income students, Chancellor Zimpher said there is "no question about it, (the cut) reduces our ability to serve." Increasing support for EOP is a signature accomplishment which must be advocated for, the Chancellor added.

CUNY Chancellor Cites Economists' Supporting Study

CUNY Chancellor James B. Millikin testified that CUNY's mission remains providing a broadly accessible, affordable and high-quality education to all New Yorkers but especially those from low-income and underrepresented groups and immigrant populations so these people may enjoy the lifetime of benefits that a college education can provide.

He pointed to a recent and "remarkable" study by economists that measured the ability of universities to provide upward mobility to low-income students, which he testified provided evidence of CUNY's national ranking and success in propelling low-income students into the middle class and beyond compared to Ivy League colleges and other private schools.

According to Chancellor Millikin, the goal of providing access to high quality education has been "advanced boldly" by Governor Cuomo's Excelsior Scholarship program which, he said, "would put a high quality education within the reach of even more lower- and middle-income students" by reducing cost and encouraging timely completion of a degree.

Support Heard for DREAM Act

The Chancellor also noted the Governor's support for passing the DREAM Act which would make government student loans available to the children of undocumented immigrants. He also provided an overview of plans to reform CUNY programs in order to maximize student achievement at lower cost.

State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia testified that the State Education Department's budget request includes a $4.5 million increase to the Higher Education Opportunity Program to help students who do not meet typical academic criteria when they enter college; an additional $1 million for science and technology programs; an additional $3.67 million for dropout prevention programs; support for Early College High Schools and passage of the DREAM Act.

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State Education Chair Elia describes plans for higher education in the 2017-2018 Executive Budget proposal.

State Offers $1 Billion in Academic Aid

Elsa M. Magee, Acting President of the State Higher Education Services Corporation, testified that State-run financial aid programs provide $1 billion in financial aid awards to more than 370,000 students who attend public and private colleges.

The Executive Budget "continues full support for all existing State grant and scholarship programs, reintroduces the DREAM Act, and proposes bold new actions to further alleviate financial barriers to obtaining a college degree in New York State," she testified.

Governor Cuomo's budget also includes a provision to keep costs at private colleges affordable by restricting the TAP program to colleges which keep annual tuition increases below $500, she said.




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…and this month in Albany
January 24, 2017

Assemblyman Farrell Reports to Community Board 12

Governor Cuomo Releases $152.3 Billion Budget for 2017
Spending Plan Includes Free SUNY and CUNY Tuition for Some

On the evening of Tuesday, January 17 Governor Cuomo released his $152.3 billion draft Executive Budget for State Fiscal Year 2017-2018, and held separate discussions of his spending plan with members of the Assembly and Senate. As described by the Governor, the Budget will include an additional $1 billion in aid for education for a total of $25.6 billion, which is less than the Board of Regents and other education advocates had asked for, as well as a plan to offer free SUNY and CUNY tuition to students whose household income is less than $125,000 per year.

Budget Extends Mayoral Control, Focuses on Infrastructure

Governor Cuomo's budget plan also includes significant policy changes including tax cuts for middle-income New Yorkers; an extension of the two percent "millionaires' tax" which he expects to collect about $4 billion in revenue if this tax assessment continues for the next two years; extension of mayoral control of New York City schools through 2020; decriminalization of marijuana; allowing movie theaters to sell alcohol; taxation and regulation of electronic cigarettes; privatization of the New York Racing Authority; and $10 billion to overhaul Kennedy Airport as part of his major infrastructure upgrades to facilities throughout our State.

Plan Includes $2 Billion for Drinking Water, Falls Under Spending Cap

One of the first aspects of the plan to see the light of day was the Governor's plan to set aside $2 billion to create a fund that will allow localities to upgrade their drinking water systems, which is a major problem in some Upstate communities whose water supplies have become polluted.

In recent years, State and local government spending has grown at a slower pace than in the past because Governor Cuomo asked for and the Legislature approved new rules that call for the budget to grow by no more than 2 percent from year to year. This has been possible, in part, due to settlements from Wall Street banks which have been accused of wrongdoing and have paid settlements to the State. This year, the Budget includes $1.4 billion in settlement money, which Governor Cuomo's plan will use to pay for capital expenses like his Kennedy Airport plan.

Budget's Effect on Low-Income New Yorkers is Unclear

While the Governor's budget clearly states his plan to extend the "millionaires' tax" on those who earn in excess of $1 million per year and households who earn a combined $2 million or per year, and is similarly clear on his intention to give a small tax cut to those who earn between $40,000 and $300,000 per year, his plan is silent on what can and will be done for New Yorkers who earn less. I expect that this important question will be key to our discussions of the Budget.

Ways and Means Committee Staff Analyzing Executive Budget Details

Having recently received the first details of the Governor's proposed budget, my Ways and Means Committee staff and I will thoroughly analyze the details as we move forward. Please look for details of our analysis in future reports, along with highlights of testimony on the Budget from the various State agency commissioners who will testify at our Joint Legislative Budget Commission hearings that will be held in the coming weeks. This information will also be posted on my Web site at nyassembly.gov.

Joint Legislative Budget Hearings Convene Beginning Today

Today, members of the Assembly and Senate engaged in the first of these thirteen Constitutionally-required hearings on Governor Cuomo's Executive Budget plan. This morning's hearing, which was the first of the cycle, was a discussion of issues related to State higher education programs and funding.

You may recall from my last report to you that Governor Cuomo earlier announced that one part of his budget is a $163 million plan that would allow students whose household income is less than $125,000 per year to attend SUNY or CUNY without having to pay tuition. Legislative leaders have been discussing this plan with advocates, some of whom have told us that it may be better to help students manage the costs of textbooks, student housing and other costs rather than offer free tuition which may not be very helpful to the poor, but it is good for the middle class.

Today's invited speakers include representatives of SUNY and CUNY as well as representatives of student government and administrators. Legislators will use their testimony in our deliberations on the Governor's budget plans as we move forward to crafting a finalized budget for State Fiscal Year 2017-2018, which begins April 1. Please look to my Web site at nyassembly.gov for highlights of their testimony during today's hearing, and the 12 others.

Effect of Possible Obamacare Repeal on State Budget Questioned

I will soon hold a series of Town Hall meetings throughout the District to discuss the question of what will happen if the new leadership in Washington carries through on their plans to get rid of the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), which provides health care coverage to millions of New Yorkers who otherwise do not have access to care. The big answer is that no one knows what they are going to do or how it will affect the country, health care providers or anything else. Governor Cuomo's economists have forecast that if Obamacare goes away entirely, the Federal government will give the State $3.7 billion less in health care funding each year.

If that should happen, it may be the case that the State itself has to pick up this cost. Like others in the Legislature I was happy to hear the Governor call for an extension of the "millionaires' tax" that increases taxes by 2 percent for individuals who make more than $1 million and households who earn $2 million per year, using this extra revenue to make up for an expected loss of revenue. However, some in the Assembly believe this will not be nearly enough to cover the cost of continuing Obamacare services if the Federal government refuses to do so. That is why you will hear some members of the Assembly call for a new assessment on the very wealthiest New Yorkers, so that the working poor may have continued access to quality care.

New Assembly Members Sworn in to Office in Albany Ceremony

On January 4 we began the process of formally opening our 2017 Legislative Session in Albany. New Assembly Members were given the oath of office and we were addressed by Speaker Heastie.

Speaker Heastie opened the 240th Legislative Session by welcoming new members to Albany. He discussed the important work we will do this year including fighting to improve education and housing while working to preserve improvements to health care, and also thanking us for again electing him to serve as our leader. Other business of the house was undertaken to prepare for the busy six months ahead before the Session concludes in late June.

Affordable Housing Remains a Top State Priority

As has been discussed in previous reports, a top priority for the 2017 Legislative Session will be granting final Legislative approval to a program that began last year and is intended to invest $2 billion in State funds in a new program to preserve and create affordable housing. Our Members and staff are in the process of reviewing details of this important plan. While that important work is ongoing, I am happy to provide good news in regard to a related affordable housing program.

Plan to Renovate Affordable Housing in Northern Manhattan Announced

Last year, along with colleagues including former Housing Committee Chair Keith Wright, I worked to get funding into the budget that will support a Greater Harlem Housing Development Corporation project. My colleagues and I were approached by leadership of this local not-for-profit, who asked for our support in funding renovation of existing apartments here in Northern Manhattan. In total, nine buildings containing 117 apartments will be improved.

This number may seem small compared to other affordable-housing programs that are now underway or under consideration, but it is my firm belief that this project will not seem like small potatoes to the hundreds of hardworking New Yorkers including dozens of families who will live in these apartments after renovations are complete. It was a pleasure to join my colleagues in supporting this project, and I look forward to further serving our community's need for housing.

NY State Minimum Wage Rises for 2017

As you may have heard, the minimum wage received by about 750,000 workers in New York State rose as 2016 gave way to 2017 because of a law we passed in Albany. As of January 1, the legal minimum wage in New York City is now $11 per hour, and this is set to rise by $2 each year until the wage reaches $15 per hour in 2018.

There is an exception for small businesses that legally allow raises to be granted at a slower pace in order to avoid harming these businesses, and the wage will rise at a slower pace upstate where the cost of living is lower.

Still, a higher minimum wage will provide real help to hardworking New Yorkers, especially those who are struggling to support their loved ones while only earning minimum wage. I often remarked during our debate in Albany on whether to raise the wage that though opponents of higher wages like to claim that better pay harms workers, history has shown that this is not true.

As a colleague pointed out, we are not harming the businesses that serve our communities. We are giving them new customers.

Yours truly,
Herman "Denny" Farrell, Jr.




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…and this month in Albany
January 4, 2017

Assemblyman Farrell Reports to Community Board 10

2017 Legislative Session Begins
New Assembly Members Sworn in to Office in Albany Ceremony

This afternoon we began the process of formally opening our 2017 Legislative Session in Albany. New Assembly Members were given the oath of office and we were addressed by Speaker Heastie. He opened the 240th Legislative Session by welcoming new members including Inez Dickens (who replaced Keith Wright) to Albany. He discussed the important work we will do this year including fighting to improve education and housing while working to preserve improvements to health care, and also thanking us for again electing him to serve as our leader.

Other business of the house was undertaken to prepare for the busy six months ahead before the Session concludes in late June.

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Assemblyman Farrell welcomes Inez Dickens, a former City Council member, to the Assembly in Albany. She was elected to replace Keith Wright, who had left office.

A New Idea for a New Year: Free College Tuition Suggested

During a speech in Queens this week, the Governor announced that he intends to pass legislation creating a new program that will grant New York State college students free tuition to State colleges. This program will apply to students if their family's household income is less than $125,000 per year. Details of the plan are forthcoming. It is an intriguing idea, and my staff and I are looking forward to reviewing the details as they are made available to us.

Affordable Housing Remains a Top State Priority

As has been discussed in previous reports, a top priority for the 2017 Legislative Session will be granting final Legislative approval to a program that began last year and is intended to invest $2 billion in State funds in a new program to preserve and create affordable housing. Our Members and staff are in the process of reviewing details of this important plan. While that important work is ongoing, I am happy to provide good news in regard to a related affordable housing program.

Last year, along with colleagues including former Housing Committee Chair Keith Wright, I worked to get funding into the budget that will support a Greater Harlem Housing Development Corporation project. My colleagues and I were approached by leadership of this local not-for-profit, who asked for our support in funding renovation of existing apartments here in Northern Manhattan. In total, nine buildings containing 117 apartments will be improved.

This number may seem small compared to other affordable-housing programs that are now underway or under consideration, but it is my firm belief that this project will not seem like small potatoes to the hundreds of hardworking New Yorkers including dozens of families who will live in these apartments after renovations are complete. It was a pleasure to join my colleagues in supporting this project, and I look forward to further serving our community's need for housing.

NY State Minimum Wage Rises for 2017

As you may have heard, the minimum wage received by about 750,000 workers in New York State rose as 2016 gave way to 2017 because of a law we passed in Albany. As of January 1, the legal minimum wage in New York City is now $11 per hour, and this is set to rise by $2 each year until the wage reaches $15 per hour in 2018.

There is an exception for small businesses that legally allow raises to be granted at a slower pace in order to avoid harming these businesses, and the wage will rise at a slower pace upstate where the cost of living is lower.

Still, a higher minimum wage will provide real help to hardworking New Yorkers, especially those who are struggling to support their loved ones while only earning minimum wage. I often remarked during our debate in Albany on whether to raise the wage that though opponents of higher wages like to claim that better pay harms workers, history has shown that this is not true.

As a colleague pointed out, we are not harming the businesses that serve our communities. We are giving them new customers.

Yours truly,
Herman "Denny" Farrell, Jr.




Video Clips:

March 12, 2015
Ways and Means Committee Chairman Farrell addresses questions relating to changes in the Gap Elimination in the Assembly Budget Proposal. E.203
 
 




Photo Slide Show:



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